FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY - SOE
EE360/ECE505:  Power Electronics
Fall, 2022

This course covers the design and operation of power electronics circuits, such as power supplies and motor controls. Using electronic circuit models for transistors and diodes developed in earlier courses, students analyze and design power circuits. Particular attention is paid to power dissipation and packaging.
(Prerequisites: EE 301, EE 231)                                                                                             Three Credits

Class location: BNW 138, Monday evenings from 6:30 to 9:00 pm. Office Hours: Mon. 5-6 in BNW 138, Tues. 3-4 in BNW129a

Learning Objectives

Learning Outcome

Cognitive Level

ABET 1-7

 1.

Describe the role of Power Electronics as an enabling technology in various applications such as flexible production systems, energy conservation, renewable energy, transportation etc.

Evaluation

2, 4, 7

 2.

Design the switching power-pole using the available power semiconductor devices, their drive circuitry and driver ICs and heat sinks.  You will be able to model these designs.

Synthesis

1

3.

Using the average model of the building block, quickly simulate the dynamic performance of dc-dc converters and compare them with their switching counterparts.

Analysis

1

4.

Design the single-phase power factor correction (PFC) circuits to draw sinusoidal currents at unity power factor.

Synthesis

1, 2

5.

Learn basic magnetic concepts, analyze transformer-isolated switch-mode power supplies and design high-frequency inductors and transformers.

Knowledge

7

6.

Learn basic concepts of soft-switching and their applications to dc-dc converters, compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and induction heating.

Knowledge

7

Grade Distribution – as of Quiz 9

Session-Recordings

Blackboard

The Blackboard system along with our course web site will be used to manage this course.  Students must submit their assignments into Blackboard for archival and grading.  All work is to be typed (including equations), drawings are to be computer-base, not scanned, hand written work.

Text:  Power Electronics: A First Course, Ned Mohan, 2012, Wiley,
ISBN: 978-1-118-07480-0,
Lecture Slides, Lecture Videos

References:

Power Electronics: Converters, Apps. And Design, N. Mohan, T.M. Undeland, and W. P. Robbins, John Wiley & Sons., 2003

Introduction to MatLab for Engineers and Scientists, Etter, Prentice-Hall, 1996, ISBN 0‑13‑519703‑1

Prof. A.K. Sinha, IIT Kharagpur – A full set of Power System Lecture Videos

Prof. Krishna Vasudevan, IIT Madras –Lectures on Modelling and Analysis of Electric Machines

Required Software:

MatLab, Student Ed. (Fairfield Student Download Instructions) or Octave (Open Source MatLab Clone)
MatLab Tutorial by B. Aliane, Simulink Power Electronics tutorial

PSpice (Now Orcad – with added PE Models),

PSpice PE Instructions, PSpice PE Lab Manual, PSpice PE Installation Instructions,

LTSpice, (Free from Linear Technology, but needs PE models) or

Multisim, (Student Version – Nat. Instr., also may need PE models)
LTSpice Tutorial, Multisim Tutorial

Grade allocation:   

Quizzes (8 of 11 count)

40%

Quiz Review Exam

30%

Design Project

30%

Total

100%

Academic Dishonesty:

Students are sometimes unsure of what constitutes academic dishonesty.  In all academic work, students are expected to submit materials that are their own and are to include attribution for any ideas or language that are not their own.  Examples of dishonest conduct include, but are not limited to:

        Falsification of academic records or grades, including but not limited to any act of falsifying information on an official academic document, grade report, class registration document or transcript.

        Cheating, such as copying examination answers from materials such as crib notes or another student’s paper.

        Collusion, such as working with another person or persons when independent work is prescribed. .

        Inappropriate use of notes.

        Falsification or fabrication of an assigned project, data, results, or sources.

        Giving, receiving, offering, or soliciting information in examinations.

        Using previously prepared materials in examinations, tests, projects, or quizzes.

        Destruction or alteration of another student’s work.

        Submitting the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without the prior written permission of each instructor.

        Appropriating information, ideas, or the language of other people or writers and submitting it as one’s own to satisfy the requirements of a course – commonly known as plagiarism.
Plagiarism constitutes theft and deceit.  Assignments (compositions, term papers, computer programs, etc. .) acquired either in part or in whole from commercial sources, publications, students, or other sources and submitted as one’s own original work will be considered plagiarism.

        Unauthorized recording, sale, or use of lectures and other instructional materials.

In the event of such dishonesty, professors are to award a grade of zero for the project, paper, or examination in question, and may record an F for the course itself.  When appropriate, expulsion may be recommended. . A notation of the event is made in the student’s file in the academic dean’s office.  The student will receive a copy.


Course Schedule:

Week

Topic

Text

Homework

Videos

Topics

9/12

Course Introduction
Power Electronics: An Enabling Technology

AC and PolyPhase Review

 

1

 

1.23, 1.25, 1.26**
MatLab-1-26

 

Mohan-1.1, Mohan-1.2

 

Semiconductors, Capacitors, MOSFET-IGBT, 3-phase (Gleb), PolyPhase-Circuits (Irwin)

9/19

Q0 (AC & PolyPhase)

Design of Switching Poles

 

2

 

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.9**

 

Mohan-2.1, Mohan-2.2

Electronics-Snubbers

9/26

Q1

Switch Mode DC-DC Converters

H-Bridges - Scott's Hybrid Electric Bike Project (2003)

 

3

3.1, 3.15, 3.44**

LTSpice #3.44

Model file, Image file

Mohan-3.1, Mohan-3.2, Mohan-3.3, Mohan-3.4, Mohan-3.5, Mohan-3.6, Mohan-3.7

LTSpice Ideal Transformer

Model file, Image file

 

10/3

Q2

Designing Feedback Controllers

 

4

 

4.1, 4.9**

 

Mohan-4.1, Mohan-4.2, Mohan-4.3

 

Classic Control Intro

10-11

Fall Break – No Classes

 

 

 

 

10/17

Q3

Rectification of Utility Power

 

5

 

5.1, 5.7**

Mohan-5.1, Mohan-5.2

Diodes-Thyristors

10/24

Q4

Power Factor Correction – Feedback Controller Design

Introduce the Design Project

 

6

 

6.7**

 

Mohan-6.1, Mohan-6.2

EE360 Design Project

 

Basic Power Electronics

10/31

Q5

Magnetic Circuits

Isolated Switch Mode Power Supplies

 

7

8

 

7.1, 7.3

Mohan-7.1

Mohan-8.1, Mohan-8.2

Inductors-Transformers

11/7

Q6

Design of High Freq. Inductors and Transformers

 

9

 

 

Mohan-9.1

 

11/14

Q7/8

Soft Switching for heating and Fluorescent Lights

 

10

 

Mohan-10.1

 

11/21

Q9

Application of SM PE in Motor Drives, UPS, and Power*

 

11

 

Mohan-11.1

 

11/28

Q10

Synthesis of DC and Low Frequency AC

 

12

 

Mohan-12.1, Mohan-12.2,
Mohan-12.3, Mohan-12.4

 

12/5

Q11

Thyristor Converters

Utility Applications of Power Electronics

 

13

14

 

 

Mohan-13.1, Mohan-13.2,

Mohan-13.3, Mohan-14.1

 

12/12

Quiz Review Exam, Design Project Discussion

 

 

 

12/19

Design Project Presentations

 

 

Last Day to upload Project Materials

Final Exams 5/15 – 5/21

**         Computer Simulation HW


CLASS EXPECTATIONS

I. TEACHER

Distribute syllabus.

Review the material described in the syllabus.

Explain material.

Identify alternate reading assignments or books that clarify the material.

Relate material to "real world" situations when possible.

Answer questions.

Be available to discuss problems.

Google Voice:

(203) 513-9427

Office Phone:

x3330

Email:

jeffrey.denenberg@ieee.org or jdenenberg@fairfield.edu

Home Page:

http://doctord.dyndns.org or http://doctord.webhop.net

Class Office Hours:

5:00-6:00 PM, Monday’s before class in BNW301C

Or after class

Be receptive to new ideas.

Announce business/class conflicts in advance.

Make up missed classes.

Prepare and administer exams.

Grade fairly.

Assign appropriate home problems.

Homework policy – reviewed in class, Quizzes

II. STUDENT

Be familiar with the prerequisite material

Linear differential equations

Passive components

Nodal and Mesh Equations

Transform Analysis

Time-Domain Analysis of RLC Circuits

Computer Tools and Tutorials for Circuit Analysis:

Use of MatLab

Use of Multisim or LTSpice (we will be using PSpice)

Ask questions and stay current.

Study the material described in the syllabus. Preferably before it covered in class and do some of the problems with answers in the back of each assigned chapter.

Complete the assigned homework.

Obtain class notes and homework if a class is missed.  View Author’s lecture video on that week’s topic(s)

Use the library and the Internet to obtain supplemental material.

Prepare for exams.

Ask for help from me (I have office hours) and/or your fellow students.

III. Disability

If you have a documented disability and wish to discuss academic accommodations, please contact: David Ryan-Soderlund at Academic and Disability Support Services (203) 254-4000, x2615, or email drsoderlund@mail.fairfield.edu, and notify the course instructor within the first two weeks of the semester.